Author Archives: Sarah Bray

How to get the most out of your sabbatical

I’m just coming off sabbatical (ok, so I still have the summer, but it FEELS like it is almost over) and thought discussing how I made the most of sabbatical could be a good blog post. A little background first. … Continue reading

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Contagious Asexuality? New research from Indiana University used genomic sequencing of Daphnia to determine that all asexual lineages share common alleles on 2 chromosomes.  More highlights: asexual males spread elements that suppress meiosis throughout sexual populations asexual strains are even … Continue reading

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How to read and understand a scientific paper: a guide for non-scientists

Originally posted on Violent metaphors:
Update (8/30/14): I’ve written a shorter version of this guide for teachers to hand out to their classes. If you’d like a PDF, shoot me an email: jenniferraff (at) utexas (dot) edu. Last week’s post…

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Baby Got Horns

A new paper in tomorrow’s issue of Nature finds a surprisingly simple explanation for the variation in horn size among Soay sheep on an uninhabited Scottish isle. Because males with the biggest horns tend to win more battles, get access … Continue reading

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Musings on monogamy or the challenges of senior seminar writing

OK, I waited way too long to get to this post.  On 2 August two papers on the origin of monogamy in mammals were published in PNAS and Science.  These papers got me excited because: 1) the evolution of monogamy … Continue reading

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Special Issue of Science on Climate Change This week’s (2 August 2013) Science is a special issue focusing on climate change.  Check out this podcast interviewing four of the authors whose research is featured in the issue.

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Mitochondrial Eve and Chromosomal Adam may have existed at the same time

Human evolutionary geneticists  use DNA passed only through the female line, mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA), or male line, the Y chromosome, to make estimates about the last common ancestor for all living humans. Earlier work suggested that the most recent common … Continue reading

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